Keeping the Short in Short Story


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Ever sit down with the intent to write a short story only to have it turn into a novella? Or even a full-blown novel? In my recent preparation for the OWFI 2012 conference contest, I re-discovered how difficult it is to keep the ‘short’ in short story. This year, I wrote a piece for the young adult short story category which had a limit of 1,200 words. Eeek!

My characters wanted me to write a story slightly outside my genre, they demanded a novel length story (which they deserve at a later time), and they had no desire to live confined within the contest guidelines. I knew going into it, they were going to be unruly. Usually when I write, I’m not concerned about word count.

In order to keep it short, I had to change my mindset. Here’s what worked for me:

  • Let the story title work for you. Choose something creative and short that fits the genre of the short story. For tips on attention grabbing titles, check out this article.
  • Strong, fleshed out characters help hook a readers’ interest. Character development is important, because even though your characters are part of a short story, they deserve full attention.
  • Don’t let backstory side track you, no matter how tempting or interesting. There’s no room for it in short fiction.
  • Stay focused on one plot, one event. The more linear time you try to cover in a story, the more complicated the story becomes which may increase word count. This one might not apply to short stories with a word count above 1,200.
  • Limit the number of characters, for the same reason listed above. More characters equal a more complicated story equals more words.
  • The story must have a complete story arc, no matter how limited the word count. The story must have a beginning, middle and end. Lesann Berry, one of my fellow campaign bloggers, recently wrote a post on story structure.
  • Make sure every word belongs. This applies to all fiction. Vanquish weak words.
  • Every item (backpack, gun, frying pan, etc.) you mention should add value to the story somehow or reveal something about your character. For example, if your character uses a frying pan as a weapon in addition to a cooking utensil, it demonstrates that the character is practical and resourceful. Also, if the character doesn’t aim, shoot, and/or threaten someone with the gun by the end of the story, the reader may not need to know about the weapon.

Do you write short stories? What technique works for you?

Halloween Anthology Coming Out Soon!


Cover art by Robyn Miley

My writer’s group, Novel Clique, and I have finally finished editing October Nightmares and Dreams for the Midwest Children’s Authors Guild. It features 14 children’s/YA short stories and 2 poems. My YA short story Blink, about the only female werewolf Huntress, will appear in the anthology.

Here’s a sneak peek at the back cover blurb:

Beware, Halloween is upon us. Soon, handkerchiefs may come to life and ghosts may appear to hinder or help. You may hear the eerie quiet of an orange grove and the rustling and moaning of a cornfield. Watch for stingy tricksters on the prowl and double-crossing siblings and friends who scatter at the first sign of trouble. Meet monsters that lurk on bedroom doors, hide inside closets, perch on porches, and linger in the mountains. If you’re brave enough, face your worst nightmare in a dark forest.

 Then, tell yourself it’s only Halloween. October Nightmares and Dreams presents a collection of stories and poems for children and young adults. Within these pages, you take a spooky journey through the stories and poems by authors of the Midwest Children’s Authors Guild.

For a sneak peek at Blink click here and scroll down.