That’s Not What I Meant, And You Know It


Dialogue is a useful tool in writing. It can move a story forward, reveal information about character motivation, plot, or backstory, or create conflict. Conflict stems from the way characters communicate, how one characters talks, what the other hears, and the emotions it invokes. For example, 

Nevan Said…

Rena Heard…

Your mother invited us to dinner, but I want some quiet time this weekend.  I don’t like you’re mother.

 

Nevan Said…

Rena Heard…

Your mother invited us to dinner and I want some quiet time this weekend. Let’s eat with your mother. Then, I’ll need time alone.

 

The method of communication you chose depends on what you’re trying to convey through dialogue. The first example will most likely lead to an argument and expose character motivation. The second, might lead to an in-depth conversation and reveal backstory.

 What techniques do you use to escalate tension through dialogue?

Advertisements

4 comments on “That’s Not What I Meant, And You Know It

  1. lbdiamond says:

    Great examples! This could definitely lead to more tension and excitement between these two characters.

  2. elisajeglin says:

    Hmmm, this is something that’s always on a writer’s mind when they write, but, I know I’ve never given the connotations of and/but that much thought before. Thank you for giving me something to look out for, I don’t want my characters fuddling up my dialogue and confusing the reader with poorly crafted communication.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s